Something a bit different today: this gif contains seven pictures of Gale Crater on Mars, from before and after Curiosity’s landing.  Each frame is a very small part of an image from the HiRISE camera on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (with brightness adjusted).  As I understand it, each of those images is a mosaic created from a number of photos taken by HiRISE, and which is then transformed so that it’s an equirectangular projection.  As you can see by the squishing of some surface features in different frames, that transformation is not perfect (also the reported latitude and longitude can be out by a couple of hundred pixels).
The HiRISE images are enormous – an average of about 20000x50000 pixels, and some of them are over a gigabyte.  If you want to explore some of Mars at that level of detail, then you can download HiView, which is free.
The frames used in this gif were:
PSP_003453_1750: 2007-04-22, “Proposed MSL landing site in Gale Crater” PSP_010639_1755: 2008-11-02, “Gale Crater - Potential MSL landing site” ESP_028256_9022: 2012-08-06, the day of Curiosity’s landing ESP_028269_1755: 2012-08-07, after landing (note the new dark dust that’s been kicked up, mostly going from about 1 o’clock to 7 o’clock either side of Curiosity) ESP_028335_1755: 2012-08-12 ESP_028401_1755: 2012-08-17 ESP_028612_1755: 2012-09-02, Curiosity’s started to move around.

Something a bit different today: this gif contains seven pictures of Gale Crater on Mars, from before and after Curiosity’s landing.  Each frame is a very small part of an image from the HiRISE camera on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (with brightness adjusted).  As I understand it, each of those images is a mosaic created from a number of photos taken by HiRISE, and which is then transformed so that it’s an equirectangular projection.  As you can see by the squishing of some surface features in different frames, that transformation is not perfect (also the reported latitude and longitude can be out by a couple of hundred pixels).

The HiRISE images are enormous – an average of about 20000x50000 pixels, and some of them are over a gigabyte.  If you want to explore some of Mars at that level of detail, then you can download HiView, which is free.

The frames used in this gif were:

PSP_003453_1750: 2007-04-22, “Proposed MSL landing site in Gale Crater”
PSP_010639_1755: 2008-11-02, “Gale Crater - Potential MSL landing site”
ESP_028256_9022: 2012-08-06, the day of Curiosity’s landing
ESP_028269_1755: 2012-08-07, after landing (note the new dark dust that’s been kicked up, mostly going from about 1 o’clock to 7 o’clock either side of Curiosity)
ESP_028335_1755: 2012-08-12 
ESP_028401_1755: 2012-08-17 
ESP_028612_1755: 2012-09-02, Curiosity’s started to move around.